the (un)bearable light(ness) of being – literally & metaphorically

December 2, 2018 sarahjameswrites

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With the Winter Solstice fast approaching I’ve been stocking up on as much light and outdoor time as I can, squirrelling it into my indoor hibernation hours, along with some seasonal decorations.

In terms of metaphorical, writing, light, I was very delighted to find out that my poem ‘Circles and Sandcastles’ won the POSITIVE IMAGES PEACE FESTIVAL POETRY AWARDS 2018. This year’s theme was ‘safe places’ and it was great to hear the wide variety of poems inspired by this at the awards’ reading and ceremony!

This month, I’ve also had my contributor’s copy of The Creel anthology (Guillemot Press) with my eel-inspired poem ‘From Wild Sargasso Seas’.

My poem ‘Ensemble‘ was the 100th poem on Words for the Wild, my poem ‘Aerial Landscapes‘ was published on Amaryllis and my photo ‘& where, then’ selected for Burning House Press’s Facing Up to the Future issue.

And his open mouth is snapshot 3

I’m super pleased to have the poetryfilm of ‘And his open mouth is an olive grove’ (first published in Synaesthesia and included in my pamphlet How to Grow Matches) on Poetry Film Live!!! This also includes some background information on the making of the poetryfilm. You can watch and read it here.

 

Finally (for now!), I’m very chuffed to have a poem selected for Carers UK’s creative writing anthology volume 5, out in December, and a prose poem/poetic flash fiction ‘Like a bird’ accepted for Unbroken Journal next April!

Meanwhile, I’ve been busy editing forthcoming V. Press publications, with 2019 looking set to offer even more titles than V. Press has before!!!

The poems and flashes lined up for LitWorld2 have been bringing me much happiness too. I love finding and pairing a photo with the beautiful words that come in. You can check those published so far online here and watch them revealed weekly for #photofriday on instagram and twitter. (Nina Lewis has also sorted an FB page for them too.) And if you haven’t sent in a submission yet (or want to send me some more), the submission details are here.

MICRO-REVIEWS

I’ve had Aquanauts (Sidekick Books) for a while. It’s one of those anthologies that I find myself picking up and dipping into again and again, each time finding something new or different to explore. The thing about Aquanauts and Sidekick Books’ publications in general is that they’re are all very beautiful, striking and totally unique. For me, this anthology is also a good example of printed poetry as way more than just words on paper; it’s poetry as an experience, an experience that unlike poetry readings/performances can be enjoyed at home (in a more introverted way) without losing any of the ‘live’ atmosphere. In fact, reading this underwater-themed anthology in this way is part of the experience – it’s like having an aquarium in my living room. Both the poems and images inside are beautiful, and varied. The book also invites interaction with prompts and spaces for the reader to add their own words/drawings, actively making them part of the creative process and each individual copy of the anthology even more unique. As it turns out, the pieces in the book are so beautiful that I’m happy just to let them be and watch/feel them be. But the invitation to swim with them is inclusive, and beguiling, like the book itself. I know this is an anthology I’ll dip into again and again!

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How to Wear Grunge (Knives Forks And Spoons Press) might not sound like the material for poetry, but it is, and not just poetry but beautiful poetry. In this pamphlet by Ruth Stacey, grunge most definitely isn’t a fashion statement or adopted look but an all-encompassing way of life. Stacey threads elements of memoir and biography, fiction and ‘fan/groupie’ style research into a beguiling narrative of questions, answers and more questions. This way of life is far from painless; it has its high points – youth, beauty, young love – but also the sharpness of addiction, rape and death. The poems call and echo to each other through use of select repetition, creating a sequence of poems that is incredibly moving, as well as rich with the mystery and appeal that celebrity musicians often generate. There’s humour too, the kind of humour that comes with hindsight and surviving. I’ve mentioned addiction already but How to Wear Grunge is as much about other addictions as it is grunge, alcohol and drugs. The characters here are also hooked on the music and personalities…on words, punctuation, maybe even poetry. How to Wear Grunge is an addictive read.

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